Woods’ love of vouchers goes unchallenged, as usual

(Promoted by Colorado Pols)

Laura Woods.

Laura Woods.

I can tell you I've heard plenty of love for vouchers on conservative talk radio. But someone who might question vouchers? That's rare.

Typical of the unchallenged statements is the one below, from State Senate candidate Laura Woods from KLZ 560-AM's Wake Up with Randy Corporon June 2. Waters is fighting Lang Sias in a State Senate primary Tuesday to take on Democrat Rachel Zenzinger.

State Senate Candidate Laura Woods: I am a believer in empowering teachers. I want teachers to be empowered to use the skills that they’ve been given to teach our kids, and mold and shape creative geniuses to come out of our schools. For that to happen, we need to get Common Core out of our schools. I’m in favor of parental choice where school is concerned. I would be very much in favor of a voucher system for schools. And I would support private school, home school, charter school, public school, across the board, evenly, so that parents have the choice in whatever they choose, their kids get the best education possible.

Listen to Laura Woods on KLZ 6.2.14

Her words flow over the airwaves free from any resistance from critical thought.

Here's a Politico article that Corporon can save in his pocket and pull out next time he has Woods or another voucher lover on his show. Titled, "Vouchers Don't Do Much for Students," the article provides a good national glimpse at the problems with vouchers.

But behind the outrage is an inconvenient truth: Taxpayers across the U.S. will soon be spending $1 billion a year to help families pay private school tuition — and there’s little evidence that the investment yields academic gains.

4 Community Comments, Facebook Comments

  1. dwyer says:

    Jason,

    Do you ever try to call in and ask these questions directly?

  2. FrankUnderwood says:

    Now if only good God-fearing, (fertilized) egg loving, homo hating, gun-toting, white Anglo Saxon Christian men and their submissive wives could redeem those school vouchers at gun shows, all would be well.

  3. Republican 36 says:

    Ms. Woods views on the Common Core standards are off base and without foundation. She will tell everyone that the Common Core is a federal government plot to take over our K-12 school system. The truth is about 45 states banded together to develope and support the Common Core standards. The standards were not developed at the behest of the Obama administraiton or any of the federal executive agencies. One of the primary pruposes of the standards is to insure colleges and universities know what they are getting when a student applies for admission from high school. For example, if a student at Denver East High School applies to Duke University and the applicant has been met the common core standards, Duke knows what they are getting. 
    The standards are a practical way to insure students meet a certain benchmark of knowledge for their coming life and it gives institutions of higher education a yardstick to judge prospective freshmen. The conservative paranoia over the standards is just another one of their conspiracy theories that has nothing to support it.

    • SayingItLikeItIs says:

      The truth is about 45 states banded together to develope and support the Common Core standards. - 

      Kind of . . . governers with a push from private foundations decided to start working together on common standards. 

      One of the primary pruposes of the standards is to insure colleges and universities know what they are getting when a student applies for admission from high school.

      Schools already had the SAT and ACT for most of this. The biggest challenge was not having writing on those tests. 

      Don't get me wrong, the standards aren't the issue to me. My issue is how will the standards be used? Who is making money off of them (testing companies, curriculum development, technology complanies, etc.) and to what beneft? The last is using high-stakes tests (part of Common Core or not) being used to evaluate teachers when evidence is clear is that students' scores is not a valid indicator of teacher effectiveness.

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