Who Is Lisa Pinto? Jeffco Parents Might Not Like The Answer

nopinto3Lisa Pinto’s resume, marked “NO” by a Jeffco employee involved in the search process.

Former Colorado GOP chairman Ryan Call, Jefferson County Communications Officer Lisa Pinto.

Former Colorado GOP chairman Ryan Call, Jefferson County Communications Officer Lisa Pinto.

Since being hired last January, Republican media consultant Lisa Pinto has been the point person for the unenviable task of messaging the controversial actions of the Jefferson County Board of Education’s conservative majority. Pinto, a former official with ousted GOP state chairman Ryan Call’s much-balleyhooed “SuperPAC” along with another GOP media type who pled guilty to campaign finance violations earlier this year, has worked to smooth over ongoing embarrassments from far-right board member Julie Williams, and brought in conservative media relations firm Novitas Communications to help improve the district’s rapidly deteriorating image.

Last January, local blogger Paula Reed wrote in detail about Pinto’s hiring, including the conclusion by members of the interview committee that Pinto was unqualified for the job of communications director for Jefferson County Public Schools. Yesterday, some of the correspondence related to this hiring process appeared on our desk–and while we’re protecting identities involved with redactions, it’s clear that Pinto had some serious issues going into her interview.

nopinto1

These handwritten notes from a Jeffco Schools employee describe Pinto as “lacking deeper experience in PR,” “guarded” and “political” and given to “lawyer speak,” with “no current experience,” “not great media contacts,” no recent on-camera experience, and (critically for this job) “no K-12 experience.” Another email strongly recommends against hiring and possibly even conducting further interviews with her, based on discrepancies in her resume:

nopinto2

Not a very auspicious review. Here’s a little more detail:

nopinto4

We’ve done some Googling as well, and we haven’t found anything close to 200 media appearances by Lisa Pinto in any capacity. Now, that’s not to say that Pinto has no on-camera experience. One of the few media appearances we were able to find with her was an episode of Politically Incorrect with Bill Maher from 2002–certainly a high-profile appearance, albeit nearly fifteen years old. But there’s a problem: appearing as a Republican-leaning pundit, this clip of Pinto being smacked down by Maher and William Shatner isn’t one that would encourage us to hire her to speak for a school district:

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In Colorado, Every Legislator’s Email Is “Emailgate”

Senate President Bill Cadman (R).

Senate President Bill Cadman (R).

9NEWS’ Jeremy Jojola reports on something you might not know, but has actually been uncontroversial standard operating procedure at the Colorado General Assembly for years:

A 9Wants to Know review of email use among public officials reveals all 100 members of the Colorado General Assembly use private accounts to conduct state business.

The policy and practice has been in place for many years, giving each individual lawmaker full control of what emails will be released when their emails become the subject of records requests under the Colorado Open Records Act…

9Wants to Know found the “state.co.us” address used by some legislators is not an actual email account, but a way for the state to re-direct all incoming emails to a private account, like Gmail or AOL.

As 9NEWS reports, the forwarding-address email system for state legislators, delivering messages to any number of private email systems, differs from other government bodies (9NEWS cites the city of Aurora as an example) with much more stringent email retention policies–and control of the email servers by an impartial public employee, whose job it is to respond to Colorado Open Records Act (CORA) requests. An email server managed by government IT staff could be configured to automatically retain copies of all emails sent and received for an appropriate length of time, and help assure that requests for open records are honestly handled.

But–surprise!–we have bipartisan consensus in the General Assembly that there’s nothing to see here.

[House Speaker Dickey Lee] Hullinghorst and [Senate President Bill] Cadman stood by the current policy, claiming it’s been working and that they can be trusted to turn over all releasable emails under the Colorado Open Records Act – even messages that may be controversial. [Pols emphasis]

“We’ve had a system in Colorado that’s worked for us for a very long time,” Hullinghorst said. “Yes, I hand it all over.”

“We’ve been CORA’d, and have provided everything that has been asked of us,” Cadman said.

It’s not like anyone would admit otherwise, right? The point is, you don’t really know. Under the present arrangement, at a certain level we just have to trust them.

Hillary Clinton.

Hillary Clinton.

Now, we’re pretty sure that Bill Cadman follows the national news, more specifically FOX News, and is therefore aware in great detail that fellow Republicans are trying desperately to gin up a scandal over exactly this sort of arrangement–a public official using a private email server with no formalized records retention policy. So, either Cadman just exonerated Hillary Clinton from the “Emailgate” controversy that the GOP is milking for all it’s worth, or…

On second thought, how much would a state-owned server for legislative emails cost again? Because that would probably be the best way for Cadman to save face. That, or Hillary Clinton appreciates Bill Cadman’s vote of confidence!

Have fun explaining this one at the next ALEC happy hour.

Colorado Loves Conservation – Our Senate, Not So Much

(Promoted by Colorado Pols)

Until recently, Colorado had a long legacy of consensus on conservation, and it’s not hard to see why. Our state is home to stunning landscapes — many of us live with nationally-renowned lands in our backyards or just a quick drive away. When you are in that kind of constant contact with the grandeur of nature, it’s hard not to recognize the value of conservation. When you live in a place like Colorado, it only seems natural that a river has a right to be healthy and flowing, and that some places are too beautiful to be fenced off and developed.

Champs Fought Hard

Unfortunately, this spirit of common cause and reason was noticeably absent from the 2015 legislative session. We saw a disappointing amount of narrow-minded bullishness on all of our priority issues, from public lands to clean energy. It wasn’t all bad — our legislative champions certainly worked hard to protect Colorado’s air, water, and land. Leaders like Reps. Daneya Esgar, Jessie Danielson, and Faith Winter and Sens. Kerry Donovan, Mike Merrifield, and Matt Jones fought hard to push proactive measures and fend off bad ones.

No Room for Reason in Colorado Senate

Unfortunately, our champions faced some tough obstacles. Those came in the form of a Senate that, with a few exceptions, refused to pass common sense conservation bills. For example, an instream flow bill, which is essentially legislation that gives a river the right to be a river, was killed in the Senate. There is no political ideology that justifies opposition to rivers.

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Get More Smarter on Tuesday (May 12)

Add this to the list of reasons why we like basketball: You can’t possibly play the game with a deflated ball. It’s time to Get More Smarter with Colorado Pols. If you think we missed something important, please include the link in the comments below (here’s a good example).

 

TOP OF MIND TODAY…

► Senator Michael Bennet (D-Denver) is smack in the middle of trade deal discussions, including the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), that will shift into higher gear today in the Senate. As Mark Matthews of the Denver Post reports:

It’s not exactly a political vise, but with a major trade deal looming, U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet is feeling pressure from both President Barack Obama, who wants it, and liberal allies, who want nothing more than to kill it.

How the Colorado Democrat navigates the debate — expected to begin Tuesday — could have long-range implications for his political future and a trade agreement among the U.S. and 11 Pacific Rim countries.

Central to the fight is a legislative package that would give Obama more authority to negotiate trade deals. He and many Republican lawmakers support the plan, but it faces opposition from Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid and other Democrats.

► State Sen. Ellen Roberts tried floating her name for the U.S. Senate (or CD-3) in an interview with the Durango Herald, and she didn’t do very well. Next time, Sen. Roberts, you might want to avoid calling your own interest in higher office “a long shot.” Tom Brady couldn’t have done a better job deflating this trial balloon.

Edgar Antillon, the restauranteur and promoter of the since-cancelled “White Appreciation Day” tells Jason Salzman that he is no longer a Republican. But he’s also not a Democrat. Antillon is, however, registered as a Republican candidate for the State House in HD-32. So, um, whatever.


Get even more smarter after the jump…

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Promoter of “White Appreciation Day” Now Says He’s Leaving Republican Party

(Uhhhh…..Promoted by Colorado Pols)

Edgar Antillon.

Edgar Antillon.

Edgar Antillon, who’s twice run for the Colorado State House and is promoting a “White Appreciation Day” at his rural Colorado BBQ joint, says he’s leaving the Republican Party.

Antillon lost his latest bid for the Colorado legislature just last year, and he’s still listed as an “active” Republican candidate on Colorado Secretary of State’s website.

But Antillon said in a Twitter exchange yesterday that he plans to close his campaign accounts as soon as possible, and he’s not a candidate currently.

“Never will I run as a Republican again,” tweeted Antillon, who led Mitt Romney’s Hispanic outreach effort in Adams County, Colorado. Antillon’s pro-gun activism has supported state GOP legislative efforts.

Antillon explained his position in a subsequent email.

Antillon: “I support gay marriage. Support a Ronald Reagan style amnesty. Support legalizing marijuana.

I once thought I was a Republican. I now know I’m not. Republicans claim to be the party of freedom…they are not.

I’m not a Democrat either though.”

Antillon is still promising to give white people a 10 percent discount on June 11 at his Rubbin’ Buttz BBQ in Milliken.

But in a development first reported by Denver’s NBC affiliate Sunday,  Antillon is now saying he’ll give everyone, regardless of race, a discount on “White Appreciation Day,” which has gained national media attention.

He insists that it was never his intention to exclude non-white races from the discount, despite telling 9News’ on tape that Hispanics like himself would not get the discount. He reiterated to 9News that the point of White Appreciation Day was to bring Americans together.

“We’re not backtracking,” he told 9News. “We’re not clarifying anything. This was the intention from the beginning.”

He’s also said he received a bomb threat at his restaurant Friday.

 

Ellen Roberts Floats Her Name for U.S. Senate or CD-3

Sen. Ellen Roberts (R-Durango).

Sen. Ellen Roberts (R-Durango).

As Peter Marcus reports today for The Durango Herald, state Sen. Ellen Roberts (R-Durango) is hoisting up a trial balloon for a potential new job in 2016 — be it for the U.S. Senate or in CD-3:

Roberts spoke to The Durango Herald on Friday, two days after the legislative session ended. She said she has time now to consider the massive 2016 undertaking.

“I recognize it would be a long-shot,” Roberts said. “But to be in the U.S. Senate, that would be something that I am in the process of thinking about.”…

…One rumor that has been circulating is that U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton, R-Cortez, is considering a run for U.S. Senate. In that case, Roberts also could vie for that 3rd Congressional District seat. But Roberts said she is less interested in that seat, and a spokesman for Tipton said, “Congressman Tipton is very happy to be serving Colorado’s 3rd Congressional District and I don’t see that changing anytime soon.”

We’ve heard Sen. Roberts’ name mentioned for higher office here and there, though we’d agree with Roberts herself that a U.S. Senate run “would be a long-shot.” As Peter Marcus noted in the Herald, Roberts is coming off a particularly tough legislative session that saw her take several difficult votes sprinkled in with some eyebrow-raising statements (including her off-the-reservation admission that SB-268 was, indeed, a bill about creating Personhood).

Congressman Scott Tipton was floating his own name for U.S. Senate back in January, though a spokesman was intentionally vague in responding to Marcus for this story. Running a campaign for Congress in CD-3 would seem more logical for Roberts, if Tipton did indeed decide to take a shot at Democrat Michael Bennet in 2016. Roberts has not had to run a serious campaign herself since winning election to the State House in 2006, and the Colorado Republican Party is a lot different today than it was 10 years ago. Unless Republicans were to completely stand down for Roberts, we don’t see how she’d ever make it out of a Primary; even if she did, Roberts would be forced to move so far to the right that she’d never be able to get back to the middle before a General Election.

Roberts also would need to overcome the political detriments of being relatively isolated in Durango. She has no name recognition along the Front Range, and Roberts has not built up any sort of donor base that could jump start an undertaking as ambitious as running for U.S. Senate. Any Republican candidate in 2016 will be compared to Sen. Cory Gardner in some respect; it is important to remember that Gardner had been carefully cultivating a broad base of Republican support for years prior to his sudden entry into the 2014 Senate race last February.

If nothing else, today’s news from Roberts should prod the likes of state Sen. Owen Hill (who also ran for U.S. Senate in 2014) to get moving, and it will probably shake loose a few more potential Republican names for 2016.

Political Nerd Christmas: Colo. Abstract of Votes Cast Now Online

Where can we find one of those bowties?

Where can we find one of those bowties?

Attention all political nerds/junkies: The Colorado Secretary of State’s office announced today that the Colorado 2013-2014 Abstract of Votes Cast is now available online. From an email announcement:

The Colorado 2013-2014 Abstract of Votes Cast is now available on our Department website. The report contains the official certified results for the 2013 coordinated, 2014 primary, and 2014 general elections for all candidates, judicial retention races, and ballot issues certified by the Secretary of State’s office.

In addition to election results, the abstract includes a directory of county, state, and federal office holders and turnout statistics by county for each race. The information in the biennial Abstract of Votes Cast is compiled from results submitted by Colorado’s 64 county clerk and recorders.

In 2014 more than 2 million Colorado voters made their voices heard and once again made Colorado a national leader in voter turnout. I hope you find the information in this report both useful and informative.

Wayne W. Williams
Secretary of State

We use the term “political nerds” affectionately here at Colorado Pols. We’re all excited about this, too!

News outlets omit fact that organizer of “White Appreciation Day” appears to be a well-known Republican activist

(Political stunt appreciation day! — promoted by Colorado Pols)

Edgar Antillon.

Edgar Antillon.

MONDAY UPDATE: Using info from a ColoradoPols commenter below, I’ve confirmed that the co-owner of a BBQ joint that will give “white Americans” a discount is an active Republican candidate for the Colorado State House.

Edgar Antillon, who’s promoting his restaurant’s “White Appreciation Day,” ran as Republican for House District 32 (Commerce City) last year–and for House District 35 (Westminster) in 2010. He lost both times. His House Distric 32 campaign is active, according to state records.

The story about the discount for white people, originally aired by Denver’s NBC affiliate, has gone viral nationally. But news outlets haven’t reported Antillon’s connection to the Republican Party.

Calls to Antillon’s restaurant, Rubbin Buttz, to find out if his “White Appreciation Day” has the backing of any of Antillon’s Republican colleagues or the Colorado Republican Party were not returned. Neither did Antillon respond to an email seeking comment.

———

Denver’s NBC affiliate, 9News, aired a story Thursday about a BBQ joint in Milliken, Colorado, that’s planning to give “white Americans” a discount later this month. From there, the story has gone viral nationally.

But news outlets failed to report that the co-owner of the restaurant, Edgar Antillon, who’s promoting his restaurant’s “White Appreciation Day,” appears to be the same conservative activist who ran as a Republican for the state legislature (District 35) in 2010, served as the Adams County chair of Mitt Romney’s Hispanic outreach effort, called “Juntos con Romney,” and organized extremist pro-gun events.

Calls to Atillon’s restaurant, Rubbin Buttz, to confirm Antillon’s background were not returned, but photos, as well as a Washington Times piece referencing his gun background, make me think it’s the same guy.

When Antillon made his legislative run in 2010, the progressive blog ColoradoPols drew on reporting from The Denver Post and provided some background on the Republican candidate,:

Antillon pled guilty to perjury after being arrested on two counts of felony impersonation in 2004. Antillon’s record includes fully 18 failure-to-appear counts on numerous mostly minor charges. Antillon told Bartels that family troubles as a youth made it difficult to appear in court, but he apparently has time to maintain a Youtube pseudonymous identity as “Juan a Be the Luchador” where he frequently poses with assault weapons (above). Antillon was personally introduced at the GOP state assembly by Frank McNulty, highlighting Antillon’s race as one they can, uh, win… “

In 2013, Antillon appeared again to organize a “Guns for Everyone” rally at the state Capitol. He and others vowed to pack concealed heat at the event, which turned out to be a bust but managed to capture the media spotlight anyway. Last year, he grabbed attention by advocating that legal marijuana users get gun permits. 

9News reported Antillon’s thoughts on his “White Appreciation Day:”

“We have a whole month for Black History Month,” Antillon said. “We have a whole month for Hispanic Heritage Month, so we thought the least we could do was offer one day to appreciate white Americans.”…

Antillon says the discount isn’t meant to discriminate, but instead bring people together. He added that he has been the target of racism in the past. He hopes opening up the discussion will prompt others to think differently about race.

“We’re all American, whether you came from a different country, or you were born here,” Antillon said. “We’re all American.”

“White Appreciation Day” is meant to bring people together? Looks more like a media stunt from a guy using his conservative-activist background to draw attention to his business. That should have been part of the news stories.

Groups Ask Hickenlooper To Veto Interest Rate Hike Bill

380_image_loanshark_8662Here’s an excerpt from a letter sent by several consumer advocacy groups including the Bell Policy Center, the Colorado Center for Law and Policy, and the Colorado Progressive Coalition to Gov. John Hickenlooper, requesting a veto of House Bill 15-1390last-minute legislation that shot through the General Assembly at the closing bell allowing lenders to dramatically jack up interest rates on specific types of personal loans:

We respectfully ask you to veto the Allowable Finance Charge for Certain Consumer Credit Transactions bill (HB15-1390). This bill, which was introduced in the final few days of session and did not get a full vetting in the Legislature, would raise the cost of credit for moderate- and low-income Coloradans on certain consumer credit transactions. Raising these caps would lead to more high-cost and unaffordable credit products, hurting Colorado consumers and middle-class families. We are not opposed to the loans, just to increasing the current rates so significantly.

The Colorado Attorney General’s Office, which regulates these loans, testified in the House about how HB15-1390 would affect these loans. While neutral on the bill, the office said that it would increase the costs of an average $6,000 loan by 38.1 percent. The Attorney General’s Office also said there is nothing to indicate that this credit product is not available to consumers or that consumers are having a hard time accessing this product.

In a legislative session that was supposed to be about the middle class, this bill moves Colorado in the wrong direction. We wish this bill had come up earlier in the session to allow more time for conversations with legislators and a greater opportunity for the views of average Coloradans to be heard. Your veto of HB15-1390 will help protect low- to moderate-income Coloradans from detrimental credit products. The Legislature can address this issue again next session in a manner that ensures all viewpoints are heard and more measured deliberations take place.

As we discussed last week, House Bill 15-1390 passed through the General Assembly at lightning speed with almost no debate. Consumer group opponents like the Bell Policy Center had no opportunity to mount an opposition to the bill. In subsequent days, we’ve heard that lobbyists for the lenders who would benefit from higher interest rates facilitated the late introduction of the bill, and paraded lenders through the legislature in the final days who essentially threatened to close up shop if they couldn’t increase interest rates–this despite the fact that tens of thousands of these loans worth hundreds of millions of dollars were made under the current rates last year. This threat, which sounds remarkably like the hollow arguments against payday lending reform a few years ago, evidently persuaded all but two members of the House to pass the bill. In the Senate, after opponents had the chance to get their feet under them, most Democrats voted against the bill--a telling difference.

1390senatevote

From all accounts we’ve heard, Gov. John Hickenlooper’s office was not part of whatever dubious greasing of the wheels occurred here, and his signature is by no means assured. Over the coming days, we expect Hickenlooper to hear from both sides, but ultimately we think there is enough backlash forming against both the bill and the shady process by which it was introduced and passed to make a veto an easy decision.

And after that, we hope for a frank conversation within the Democratic House caucus–about how sticking it to subprime borrowers in the closing hours of the legislative session is not how you “protect working families.”

Get More Smarter on Monday (May 11)

We can see clearly now. It’s time to Get More Smarter with Colorado Pols. If you think we missed something important, please include the link in the comments below (here’s a good example).

 

TOP OF MIND TODAY…

Joe Neguse, the Democratic nominee for Colorado Secretary of State in 2014, has been appointed by Gov. John Hickenlooper as the new head of the Department of Regulatory Agencies (DORA). From a press release:

Gov. John Hickenlooper announced today Joe Neguse will be the executive director of the Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies (DORA) effective June 1, 2015. He will replace Barbara Kelley who has served in the role since 2009.

“Joe’s experience as an attorney, civic leader, and public servant will be an invaluable asset to DORA,” said Hickenlooper. “Our business friendly environment is an essential part of Colorado’s economic success, and Joe will champion that effort to further grow our vibrant business community and protect consumers.”

Tell us we’re not alone here: We can’t see or hear “DORA” and not immediately think of “The Explorer.”

► Congressional Republicans are preparing to introduce legislation outlining a late-term abortion ban as soon as this week. You know, because Congress has nothing else to do.

► With the 2015 Colorado Legislative Session in the rear-view mirror, media outlets around the state are rolling out their “Winners & Losers” and assorted summaries of the session. Joey Bunch of the Denver Post writes that the middle class was ignored by both Republicans and Democrats; Bunch, Lynn Bartels and John Frank of the Post combine to play Win, Lose, and Draw.


Get even more smarter after the jump…

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Ken Witt: Not Very Nice (or Smart)

A new story out of the scandal-plagued Jefferson County school board late last night, following an ugly exchange between the chairman of the new conservative majority Ken Witt and a Jeffco student representing the group Jefferson County Students for Change. A complaint filed by Jeffco parent Wendy McCord today recounts what happened:

Bullying is defined as “any written or verbal expression, or physical or electronic act or gesture, or a pattern thereof, that is intended to coerce, intimidate, or cause any physical, mental or emotional harm to any student.”

Witt made a defamatory statement regarding a District student, who is a minor, at the Meeting. He not only accused her of using racial epithets, he also directed district staff to post social media screenshots that identified the student by name. In addition, Witt said he refused to have anything to do with the organization that this student represents.

Aside from the obvious hypocrisy that Witt won’t associate with students who essentially “liked” a Tweet but continues to sit next to (and serve on the Board with) a woman who posted material from an identified hate group encouraging parents to keep their children out of schools to protest a day designed to prevent bullying of LGBT students and staff, Witt’s statements were completely unacceptable.

Since the moment Witt, Newkirk and Williams took office, they have repeatedly embarrassed this District. They continue to degrade and demean not only our staff but, as evidenced in this circumstance, our students. These are the very stakeholders the Board and all district staff are supposed to protect.

In the video above, you can see minority board member Jill Fellman responding to the student, suggesting that the board use available time in a future meeting to have a conversation with the student group Jeffco Students for Change. Witt interrupts Fellman to accuse the leader of this group, who was one of the handful of people still in attendance at this meeting after midnight, of “favoriting…on Facebook er social media” (Witt is a little unclear about what kind of social media he is referring to) “racial epithets about district staff.” On the basis of this, Witt announces that he “will not have any association with this group.” It’s not seen in the video, but Witt directed to have a Tweet identifying the student in question projected on the large screen at the front of the room.

Readers will recall that the communications director for Jeffco schools, Lisa Pinto, has claimed she was racially insulted via Twitter over a post from an anonymous spoof account about “burritos” being served–in fact a reference to the meeting we helped publicize earlier this year between Witt and the conservative board chairs of several other Colorado school districts at Lakewood’s Jose O’Shea’s Mexican restaurant. This case of silly misplaced outrage formed the basis of a notably unsuccessful countermessage campaign from the Independence Institute, hoping to garner sympathy for Pinto–and shift attention away the ongoing PR disaster that is board member Julie Williams, or the district’s increasingly bad-faith contract negotiations.

It’s necessary to explain all of that in order to understand just how off-base Witt was in attacking this student and the student group represented. Once you understand this, Witt’s ridiculous bullying of a student he is charged with representing over merely “starring” something entirely inoffensive, projecting the student’s name for all to see in the board room and disparaging an entire group of Jeffco students over it…well folks, it’s pretty outrageous conduct. Not to mention, given the recent controversy over Williams’ sharing of a hate group’s call to defend discrimination, hypocritical in the extreme.

Which seems to be the rule these days on the Jeffco school board.

Eight Great Stories on the Colorado Legislative Session

(Yeah, we were hoping for 9, too — Promoted by Colorado Pols)

Below I’ve listed some of my favorite reporting about Colorado’s legislative session that ended Wednesday.

My favorite: The Denver Post’s John Frank wrote an accessible yet detail-rich article on the failed effort to secure funding for a wildly successful teen-pregnancy-prevention program. Read it here: IUD Jewelry Emerges at Colorado Capitol to Demystify and Educate on Birth Control

The Grand Junction Sentinel’s Charles Ashby provided a cool look at the flaming arrows launched at Republican Rep. Dan Thurlow. Read it here: Thurlow Defends Record

Colorado Public Radio reporter Megan Verlee’ provides an outside-the-Capitol perspective on the teen-pregnancy issue. Listen here: For Colorado Teen Moms, There’s Help but Daunting Statistic

Colorado Public Radio’s Verlee demystified the complicated debate about the Earned Income Tax Credit. Listen here: 5 Things to Know about the Earned Income Tax Credit, a Proven Poverty Reliever.

The Post’s Joey Bunch and John Frank teamed up to show how middle class reality connects to the legislature. Read it here: Fear and Worry in Colorado’s Middle Class Lures Politicos.

Denver Post reporter Lynn Bartels explained how a bill offering help for the middle class was killed over one lawmaker’s concern that his rich constituents wouldn’t like it. Read it here: Upper Class Protected During Debate about Saving for College. 

Great in-depth reporting by the National Journal’s Nora Kaplan-Bricker about Colorado’s latest birth-control battle and teen pregnancy program. Read it here: The Big Battle Over a Little Device.

And finally, I can’t resist adding the Aurora Sentinel’s outstanding editorial on the failed teen-pregnancy prevention measure. (Sorry for the repeated citations of coverage of this legislation, but it generated the most inspired reporting.) Read it here: The birth of ignorance; get science right before voting on teen pregnancy bill.